A Cool New Classroom Game from Quizlet!

Have you tried the new classroom game from Quizlet?

I confess.  Yesterday, I really needed an engaging way to help my students review our big unit on Chromosomes, Cell Cycle (Mitosis), and Meiosis.  Most of my students are familiar with Quizlet https://quizlet.com as a study tool for electonic flash cards (which they love to use on their phones).  Some, however, weren’t aware that there are also learning games they could do instead of just flash cards.

Their teacher, however, was OVERJOYED to discover the new CLASSROOM GAME through Quizlet Live https://quizlet.com/live 

How Does It Work?

Honestly, I couldn’t try it out before I actually tried it with my 1st block class (my sweet little guinea pigs!) but they were up for the challenge to help ME learn how to play 🙂

First Step:  I created (ummm actually I “collected”) awesome flash cards related to our topics from talented professionals on Quizlet.  I think by the end, I had around 80 (which is probably way too many lol)

Second Step:  When I pulled up the cards for the review (all 80 of them lol), I chose the button marked “Live” at the very end of the line next to the “Gravity” game.  I told it to “Create Game” and it asked me to choose which combination of prompts I wanted.  Since I had no clue which one would work best for the type of cards I “collected”, I chose the tile on the Right (“Term and Definition”).  Unfortunately, after we played the game one time, we decided to try the other choice (“Definition and Term”) and it worked MUCH better for the type of cards we were using.  Once this choice is made, click “Create Game” and it will generate a code for students to join the game.

Third Step: When students join the game, their names automatically appear in a list on the main page.  You can cancel out a student’s name by clicking on it (in case they decide their name is “butthead” for the day or something 🙂 ) Once all students have joined, click on the “Create Game for __ Students” button and it will automatically sort the kids into small teams (YAY!) and name their team with animal names (which this science teacher LOVES).  It’s easy to mix up the teams again with the shuffle button at the top of the page.  I re-mixed everyone after each match. The student screen (we used Chromebooks but they can play on their phones) will say “Congratulations, you’re a Zebra!” or “You’re a T-Rex!”.  Students can then get into their groups easily this way.

Playing the Game: I loved the collaborative nature of this game.  Within each 3-4 student group, everyone has the same question across the top of their screen BUT each individual student has 3-4 answer choices on their screen, different from everyone else in their group.  It forces the group to discuss the correct answer choice before the appropriate person chooses it on their screen.  Some of my kids who don’t regularly interact had plenty of time together using this game and I loved it!  Teams get 1 pt for each correct answer.  First team to 12 wins.  However, if they miss a question, their score returns to 0.  I had SEVERAL groups at 9 or 10 and go back down to 0 by missing a question.  It was great!  🙂 Everyone keeps up with everyone else’s group progress by watching the “Leader board” projected on my board at the front of the room.  It got quite competitive!  I let my students use their notes if they wanted and I had several taking notes on things they just couldn’t remember (without my prompting at all! Shocker!).

We ended up playing all block (because we kept switching groups).  The kids were very engaged.  I don’t think I saw one bored teenager during the whole experience. My Principal even came in and watched for a little while.  I did share my flashcard deck with my students (I gave them the code) so they could review on their own time as well.  Overall, my students said they loved it and really wanted to do it more often when we have a test.  This is definitely going to be a repeat performance.  Great review game!

 

 

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About Edgy Instruction

Science Teacher (Biology, AP Biology, and Forensic Science), Anatomy Professor, and former Instructional coach.
This entry was posted in biology, Instructional Coaching, Strategies, T.I.P Theory Into Practice, Teaching and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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